Archive for October, 2013

Raspberry Zinger Fragrance Oil

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

Natures Garden's Rasberry Zinger Fragrance OilRaspberry Zinger Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

A yummy and delicious smelling sweet treat for your products, Natures Garden’s Raspberry Zinger Fragrance Oil is almost too luscious to pass up.  This perfectly balanced fragrance oil of creamy coconut, raspberry, and buttercream is a delectable addition to body care products or home scenting items.  An amazing duplication of the scrumptious dessert, Raspberry Zinger is a cream of the crop scent when it comes to bakery aromas.

What does Raspberry Zinger Smell Like?

Ever eaten a Hostess Raspberry Cream filled Zinger? Well, this fragrance oil by Natures Garden is the duplication of the aroma. This wonderful creative scent begins with sweet raspberry and toasted coconut, middle notes of buttercream frosting, and bottom notes of freshly baked yellow sponge cake. Makes you very hungry! A Best Seller!  An NG Original!

How Do Our Customers Use Raspberry Zinger Fragrance Oil?

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers use this fragrance oil in their 100% Soy, Pillar of Bliss, parasoy, paraffin, WOW, and Joy wax candles.  This scent is amazing in candles, and has a fantastic hot and cold scent throw.  Raspberry Zinger fragrance also works well in room sprays, and tart and oil burners.

For bath and body crafters, this fragrance oil is quite a treat.  The usage rate is 5%, and is used to make: body scrubs, perfumes, bath bombs, melt and pour soaps, lotions, bath gels, whipped body butters, body creams, and spray lotions.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, here are the official testing results:  Some acceleration, no ricing.  Good scent.  Smells just like the real thing.  Discolors to a chocolate color.

Cinnamon Sticks Fragrance Oil

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

rf-42Cinnamon Sticks Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This best selling fragrance oil is the perfect scent for this holiday season.  Even though this scent reminds many people of Christmas, our customers consider this fragrance a MUST HAVE for their year round product lines too.  This “knock your socks off” cinnamon scent is a huge success; and many of our clients find that their customers absolutely love products made with this fragrance oil.  This perfectly plain, true cinnamon scent is great alone; but many of our customers also suggest mixing Cinnamon Sticks fragrance oil with vanillas or other spice scents to make amazing customized blends.  Cinnamon Sticks Fragrance Oil even made the cut for the Natures Garden 2013 Customer Favorite Fragrance Oils

What does Cinnamon Sticks Smell Like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is the aroma of freshly ground cinnamon bark. 

How Do Our Customers Use Cinnamon Sticks Fragrance Oil?

In the candle crafting realm; our customers use this fragrance oil in their Joy Wax, Soy Wax, Pillar of Bliss, 464, paraffin, paraffin blends, and WOW wax.  This fragrance oil makes extremely strong candles and tarts.  In fact, cinnamon sticks fragrance does not only have a superb hot throw, but also an extremely strong cold throw too.  This phenomenal scent has also been reviewed to work well with melts in electric burners, potpourri burners, reed diffusers, sachet beads, and incense.   

In the realm of bath and body, the usage percent for this fragrance oil is .05% for Bath Oils, Soaps, and Bath Gels, and a .01% for Lotions and Perfumes.  This fragrance oil has been used to make: melt and pour soaps, body sprays, body butters, lotions, and shower gels.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is awesome to work with.  Here are the official results:  Perfect Pour.  No ricing, no acceleration.  Discolors to a pale yellow.  Stays strong during cure.  Great cinnamon scent on its own or mixed with other scents. 

Fragrance Oil Terminology

Monday, October 28th, 2013

chalkboard pic1The fragrance industry has a language of its own that is used to describe, quantify and qualify the processes, ingredients and sensations with regard to aroma.  These commonly used terms help perfumers, evaluators and clients exchange ideas.


ABSOLUTE
- A concentrated fragrance material derived from natural plant product, processed by means of enfleurage, alcohol extraction or steam distillation.

ACCORD- “Fantasy Accords” are based on natural aromas that cannot be extracted in true olfactive form.  The cumulative result of balancing ingredients to achieve an “original” effect is the “creation” aspect of perfumery .

ANOSMIA- Insensitive to odors. Specific anosmia is insensivity to a particular substance, such as musk.

AROMATIC- A fragrance with a strong aroma of herbs, spices or camphor.

BALANCE- Balance is the result of the perfect adjustment of odor strength of combined ingredients.

BITTER- An odor which causes a bitter taste on the taste buds when smelled.

BLEND- A mixture of natural and / or synthetic aromatic ingredients.

BLOOM- Good top note diffusion with middle notes becoming full and rich.

BODY- The heart and main part of the fragrance. The characteristic note when the most volatile top note components have lost their dominance and all of the middle components of the fragrance come into play.

BOUQUET- A harmonious blend of several single floral notes in a fragrance compound.

BOTTOM NOTE- Also called the base note or dry down of the fragrance. This note contains the fixatives of  the fragrance and imparts long lasting qualities.

CHEMICAL- Synthetic smelling, lacking the richness of naturals.

CLOYING- A term used to describe excessive sweetness in a fragrance.

COMPOUND- A mixture of aromatic ingredients that form a fragrance composition.

DIFFUSION- Also described as “throw” or “lift”, this term expresses the fragrance’s ability to radiate from  the bottle or from a finished product.

DISTILLATION- The process of purifying a volatile material by applying heat to turn it into vapor, then recovering the material to pure liquid by condensation which yields essential oil.

DRYDOWN / DRYOUT- Another term for bottom note.

EARTHY- The aroma of freshly turned soil.

ENFLEURAGE- The traditional method of separating the absolute aromatic material from the flowers by placing petals between layers of fat to which they impart their odor. The layering is repeated with fresh petals until the fat is rich in the flowers’ essential oils. The odor is then extracted from the fat with alcohol, after which the alcohol is distilled off, leaving the aromatic absolute.

ESSENTIAL OIL- An oil obtained from a variety of natural sources such as flowers, leaves, seeds, roots, bark or buds.

FIXATIVE- A material incorporated into a fragrance compound to retard volatilization of the fragrance or stabilize the fidelity of the fragrance character.

FLAT- A fragrance that is lacking distinction.

FRAGRANCE- A composition of various synthetic and natural aromatic materials that create a definite odor effect.

Kinds of Fragrance Notes

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

There are several different categories of notes used to create a fragrance oil.  These notes offer fragrance oils different elements.  Here is a list of fragrance notes and what aspects they provide to an aroma.

ANIMALIC ingredients create allure within a fragrance.  Generally base note materials, animalic nuances add subtle sensual tones.  Aromatic animalic ingredients can be used to enhance spicy, woody, and sweet base notes.  They can sometimes produce a leathery tone.  Balance is important when using the aromatic animalic ingredients to prevent unpleasant and repulsive base notes.
EXAMPLES OF ANIMALIC INGREDIENTS:  Musk, Civet

rf-aa18BALSAMIC notes are warm and/or sweet and can frequently be found in the resinous group of materials.  Balsamic notes support a fragrance from within, offering richness and providing a natural sensation.  Base notes are sometimes composed of several balsamic materials.
EXAMPLES OF BALSAMIC MATERIALS: Amber, Tolu, Fir

CAMPHORACEOUS/ AGRESTIC notes create a cooling sensation, and can be described as fresh.  Natural essential oils in the herbaceous family often exhibit camphoraceous tones, with naturally occurring camphor oil producing this effect.  On some occasions camphoraceous tones can produce a medicinal effect.
EXAMPLES OF CAMPHORACEOUS MATERIALS: Rosemary oil, Eucalyptus oil, Camphor powder

rf-2019CITRUS/ HESPERIDIC tones are easily identified due to the association with food and beverages.  Citrus essential oils are produced from the citrus fruit peel, and a fresh, slightly acidic note is displayed.  Citrus tones are usually top notes where they produce a fresh, juicy, effervescent effect.
EXAMPLES OF CITRUS MATERIALS: Lemon oil, Grapefruit oil, Bergamot oil

FLORAL is the largest generic fragrance category.  Within the floral category there are many sub categories such as aldehydic floral or green floral.  Flowery notes such as rose, gardenia, or jasmine can be used alone or in combination with one another to produce a “floral bouquet.”  Since some flowers have little or no scent, creative floral accords are often produced to fulfill the need for scents such as daisy or orchid.  Floral tones will generally be found at the heart of the fragrance.
EXAMPLES OF FLORAL NOTES: Lily, Tuberose, Floral bouquet

fresh fruit slicesLike the citrus accords, FRUIT notes can be easily identified due their similarity to real fruit aromas.  Sweet/sour tones found in apple, peach, strawberry, and banana are replicated for use in perfumery.  These fruit compounds are generally produced from synthetic materials, although touches of natural materials such as critrus may be added for a juicy effect.  Fruit notes will be found in the top note or middle note of a scent, but exceptions exist in fruit scents such a peach which have creamy and sweet undertones.
EXAMPLES OF FRUIT NOTES: Apple, melon, raspberry

The GREEN category is very significant in today’s market.  Market positioning of products based on “natural themes” has created a demand for fragrances that smell like plants, leaves, and grasses.  Green notes provide bright, strong, natural smelling accents for all types of fragrances.  Green notes can be top notes, middle notes, and they traditionally exhibit food stability in a wide variety of products.
EXAMPLES OF GREEN NOTES: Herbs, Vegetables, Leaves

rf-98MARINE notes add fresh, bright, watery, and/or algae like accents to fragrance blends.  They are rarely used alone due to their elusive quality, yet combined with florals, woods, or fruit types they create sparkle and add a natural sensation.  Marine notes are often found accenting the top note of a scent and are reminiscent of the smell of sea breezes.
EXAMPLES OF MARINE NOTES: Sea spray, Dewy, Ocean breeze

The MINT family is characterized by its pierce cooling effect.  Mint provides an invigoration effect and fresh lift for all fragrance types.  It has become more important as a single note in today’s products that feature natural positioning.  Mint accents the top note of a fragrance.
EXAMPLES OF MINT INGREDIENTS: Peppermint, Spearmint, Menthol

rf-112SPICE notes are familiar due to their use in cooking and baking.  They create warm or pungent sensations, and are used in almost all fragrance types.  Most spice notes are derived from nature, and they can be found accenting the middle notes of a fragrance or used alone.
EXAMPLES OF SPICE INGREDIENTS: Cinnamon, Ginger, Pepper

SWEET notes are important base notes for most fragrance blends.  Recalling familiar sensations found in vanilla, sugar, honey and syrup, sweet notes are long lasting and comforting.  Gourmand type scents have created a new demand for sweet notes in perfumery, where they provide edible sensations that captivate the senses.
EXAMPLES OF SWEET NOTES: Vanilla, Caramel, honey

rf-117WOODS are important building blocks for fragrance.  Woody notes enhance and enrich the base notes of most fragrance.  They provide warmth, naturalness and long lasting richness.   Most woody notes are derived from nature, where essential oils are distilled from fresh cut wood, tree bark or roots of a tree.  In today’s market we find wood blends being used frequently in candles, particularly at the prestige level of distribution.
EXAMPLES OF WOOD INGREDIENTS: Sandalwood, Cedar wood, Vetiver

What Ingredients are in Fragrance Oils?

Friday, October 25th, 2013

fragrance bottleMost fragrances are a combination of many aromatic ingredients.  These ingredients are derived from nature or created by scientific methods. Natural Ingredients include essential oils, resins, and absolutes.

Natural Ingredients:

AROMATIC ESSENTIAL OILS are derived from plants using either distillation or cold pressing.  They are generally in liquid form.  An essential oil from one plant can vary in color, odor, and price depending on the crop from which the oil is derived.  Mother Nature rules here and variations between lots of the same oil must be assessed for suitability.  And, not all plants yield aromatic essential oils.

Examples of Aromatic Essential Oils are:  Orange Oil, Lavender Oil, Patchouli Oil, Cedar Wood Oil

RESINS are materials which are exuded from a plant when the other layer of the plant is cut.  They are dense and sticky and may solidify into a solid mass.  Heat may be required to melt some resins.   Resins are long lasting fragrance ingredients.   Examples:   Myrrh resin, Benzoin resin, Fir resin, Oakmoss resin, Copel Resin Tears.

ABSOLUTES are created by removing the aromatic components from plants which cannot yield essential oils.  Many plants are too fragile to be distilled; therefore the absolute is the form in which we capture the aromatic components of the plant.  The absolute is highly concentrated and somewhat viscous.  Now, the yield of absolute material per plant is exceptionally small, and the processing is very labor intensive.  As a result, absolutes are usually very expensive.

Examples:  Rose absolute, Orange flower absolute, Jasmine absolute, Narcisse absolute.

Manmade Ingredients include aromatic ingredients in liquid, crystalline, or powder form.  Commonly called chemicals, manmade fragrance ingredients produce a wide variety of aromatic sensations.  Some of these ingredients are also found in nature, but science can reproduce them synthetically.  The synthetic versions are generally less expensive, more consistent in odor and color and widely available.

Aromatic chemicals offer the perfumer a vast palette of materials to compliment natural ingredients.  They help control the cost of a fragrance and help ensure consistent quality.  Many aromatic chemicals can create intense, unusual or dramatic effects in a fragrance.  Most fragrances are a combination of the natural and synthetic ingredients.  The perfumer will choose materials based on odor, cost, and stability in the product being scented.
Examples of manmade aromatic materials:  citral, linalyl, acetate, phenyl, ethyl, vanillin.

These ingredients form Fragrance Oils.

Parts of a Fragrance Oilfragrance-oils

A fragrance oil is divided into 3 distinct parts.  The top note, the middle note, and the base note.  Each of these usually has an assortment of ingredients.

Top notes are the most volatile fragrance ingredients.  The top notes give the fragrance its initial burst and can provide impact in a finished product.  Top notes are the first to evaporate, leaving the middle notes of the fragrance to be explored.  Traditional top notes include citrus oil and light aromatic chemicals such as esters.

Middle notes are also called the fragrance heart.  They represent the true fragrance character.  The middle notes are longer lasting than the top notes.  These ingredients form the fragrance signature and are evident throughout most of the life of the fragrance.  Typical middle notes include floral, spice, and fruit tones.

Base Notes are also called the bottom notes or dry down.  Base notes are the longest lasting components of the fragrance.  These ingredients support the fragrance and give it depth.  Base notes remain long after the top and middle notes have evaporated.  Perfumists use base notes to anchor the volatile fragrance notes in a fragrance.  Commonly used materials for base notes are musk, vanilla, resins, and woods.

 

Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance Oil

Friday, October 25th, 2013

f-58Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This light, fresh, floral scent is beautiful and graceful.  Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance Oil smells just like the real perfume, and according to our customers it is an excellent rendition.  Many of our customers find that not only do they love this clean smell, but their customers do too; buying up whatever products this scent is in.  Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance is a classy scent that is feminine and chic.  This fragrance oil is a perfectly lovely scent addition to any feminine product line. 

What does Amazingly Grace Type Smell Like?

A feminine fragrance oil by Natures Garden that will make you feel pretty…oh so pretty!  Italian bergamot and sparkling lemon are sweetened with freshly picked citron and neroli.  A white floral jasmine, orange blossom and rose are blended with sheer musk and cedarwood. 

How Do Our Customers Use Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance Oil?

For candle makers and home scent crafters, this fragrance is divine.  This fragrance performed well in soy, palm pillar, gel wax, Joy wax and WOW wax candles.  The scent throw is wonderful in both the hot and cold throw.  Some of our customers even use Amazingly Grace Type Fragrance Oil for room sprays using odor eliminator, and absolutely loved the outcome.  They do however; also use this scent in their oil burners and hanging air fresheners.

On the bath and body end, this graceful feminine floral is used to make an array of products.  The usage percent for this fragrance oil is 5%, and is used to make:  body sprays, lotions sprays, melt and pour soaps, body butters, lotions, shampoos, conditions, and roll-on perfumes.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is well worth the effort.  Here are the official results:  No discoloration, no acceleration, stick blend for ricing.  Excellent scent retention.  We have even had hot process soapers comment as to how well Amazingly Grace Type scent holds in their soaps too!



Cold Process Shaving Soap Recipe

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

shaving-soap-pic1When it comes to grooming for a man, one of the most important aspects is a nice, clean, close shave.  But, did you know that each time you shave, your facial skin loses sebum?  It is these very same natural oils that help reduce your facial skin from drying out (chapping).  That is why when shaving facial hair, it is important to use a shaving cream or gel.  These products are used to create a barrier to help reduce the friction on the skin from the razor’s sharp edge.  What using a shaving cream or gel will do is prevent those pesky red shave bumps from appearing.  Therefore to prepare for a clean shave, a good lathering shaving cream is a necessity in any shaving arsenal.

We have been playing around with a few different shaving cream recipes for a while.  We wanted to make sure that when we did create a finalized recipe not only would it have skin loving benefits, but also have amazing lather too.  And, the great news is- we nailed it.

The first step in creating a rich lathering shaving cream is to select the right kind of ingredients for this cold process recipe.  The two biggest categories that were important to this recipe was lather and glide.

To help assist the lathering aspect, we selected:

Coconut Oil 76-  a staple in soap making.  This oil adds tremendous bubbles to soap- aka lather.
Palm Oil-  another list topper in soap making.  This oil adds a rich, creaminess to the lather.
Castor Oil- another oil that adds to a rich and creamy lather.  And, this oil also helps to attract moisture to the skin.
Lanolin Oil-  great lathering ability in soap.  Also provides moisturizing elements to the skin.
Shea Butter-  this butter provides a wonderful creamy lather and has the bonus of conditioning aspects for the skin.

When it came to a smooth glide, we knew that Bentonite Clay was the go to ingredient for this.  Bentonite Clay provides for a very nice glide on the skin’s surface.  This was a no brainer to include.  The Bentonite Clay in the finished shaving soap will make for a more comfortable shave with no irritation.

Making a cold process shave soap is really very simple.  The soaping procedure pretty much stays the same, however, there are a few differences for this recipe.  First, we decided to add sodium lactate to the recipe.  The addition of this ingredient provides for natural moisturizing elements in the finished product, which is great for shaving soap.  On the soapers end, Sodium Lactate also helps the soaps to unmold easier, which brings us to the second difference.

Instead of using a loaf mold for this recipe, you pour the soap batter into basic circle molds.  The first time that we tried this recipe, we did not include the sodium lactate.  And, although the open portion of the soap in the mold was beautiful; once we popped the soaps out of the mold, let’s just say we knew we could do better (that is with sodium lactate).

As for the Bentonite Clay, this is added to the soap batter at emulsion.  You will want to ensure that this clay is incorporated throughout the whole mixture.  The best way that we found to do this is to use a stick blender, as well as a spatula.  You will have to scrap the sides of the bowl several times and stick blend in between when mixing.  Once you notice all clumps of clay are broken up and your batter is smooth; you are safe to pour.

The shaving soap recipe is just that simple.  We did stick the molds in the freezer before popping the soaps out.  The addition of sodium lactate and freezing did help to remove the soaps from the molds with ease.  We found that these two little steps made a world of difference when it came to unmolding.  It was just hands down a way better route to go.  After the long awaited cure time, the result of the shaving soap is absolutely phenomenal.  The lather is truly rich, creamy, and plentiful.  The soap is smooth and really provides a nice gentle glide for the razor.  The final conclusion that we had for this recipe is once you try a bar, you will never go back to store bought shaving creams again.

If this blog has peaked your interest in trying to make your very own shaving soap, check out the Cold Process Shaving Soap Recipe.  You can either click on the link, or find the recipe under the cold process soap in the Free Recipes and Classes section of Natures Garden’s website.  You will not be disappointed.

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.


Brown Sugar and Fig Type Fragrance Oil

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

brown sugar figBrown Sugar and Fig Type Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

A fragrance oil that is loved by men and women alike, Brown Sugar and Fig Type is a dead on dupe of the original.  The absolute perfect scent to complete your fall or winter line, this fragrance oil is deep, warm, sweet, and pleasantly interesting.  Some of our customers even comment that Brown Sugar and Fig Type is quickly outselling their other top selling fragrances in products.  And, if there is one thing that all of our customers agree on with this fragrance oil, it is that they are glad they purchased it.

What does Brown Sugar and Fig Type Smell Like?

This magical, complex fragrance oil by Natures Garden is composed of top notes of fresh figs, peaches, and passion fruit; followed by middle notes of coconut milk, vanilla orchid, jasmine, muguet, and freesia; well-balanced with base notes of vanilla beans, caramel, maple sugar, fig leaves, and musk.

How Do Our Customers Use Brown Sugar and Fig Type Fragrance Oil?

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy, pillar, paraffin, parasoy blends, WOW, and Joy wax candles.  The scent is amazingly strong in the hot and cold throw.  In fact, many of our customers comment of how quickly the scent of their candles fills the room.  For those of you that are home scenters, this scent performs well in this aspect too.  Brown Sugar and Fig Type works great in oil burners, sachet beads, and air fresheners.  The scent is strong and long lasting.

On the bath and body end, this fragrance oil is amazing!  The usage percent for this scent is 5%, and is used to make:  Melt and pour soaps, bath whips, body butters, homemade lotions, shower gels, perfume oils, body splashes, lotions bars, sugar scrubs, and bubble bombs.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance received awesome reviews, and is wonderful to soap.  Here are the official results:  Great seller for both men and women, works beautifully, perfect pour, no ricing, no acceleration, no discoloration, scent is very strong after cure.

If you are interested in trying Brown Sugar and Fig Type Fragrance Oil in a recipe, Natures Garden has a wonderful Brown Sugar Scrub Recipe using this fragrance oil.  You can just click on the link, or find the recipe under the Free Recipes and Classes section of the website.

Football Field Candle Loaf Recipe

Friday, October 18th, 2013
bonnie-pic1

This is Bonnie of Natures Garden.

It is time to get excited!  Another Thursday has passed which means that we have another employee spotlight creation to share.  We are currently in week 10 of the Natures Garden Employee Challenge.  Each week we ask one of the employees to share their spotlight creation- a project/recipe that they create using Natures Garden’s supplies and one of their personal favorite fragrance oils.  Creativity is highly encouraged!  This week’s spotlight creation was done by Bonnie, one of our newer employees at Natures Garden.  Her project is tactfully named Football Field Candle Loaf.

Bonnie was inspired by the theme of football since she has several family members that are football fans.  She also wanted to produce an item that men can make and use in their own “man caves”.  So, considering all of this Bonnie decided that she would make a loaf candle that would resemble a football field.  The two fragrance oils that she selected for this were Fresh Cut Grass (for the field) and Leather Jacket (for the football).

football-candle1

A image of the finished Football Field Candle Loaf and football melt and pour soaps.

Besides the football loaf candle, Bonnie also brought another unique idea to share with everyone.  One night while she was figuring out the specifics of her project, she had ordered pizza for dinner.  When it arrived, and she opened the box; a light bulb went off.  She saved and washed the pizza saver.  (If you do not know what this is, it is the small plastic table that the pizza companies place in the center of the pizza to prevent the cardboard from falling in.)  She was inspired.  Bonnie thought that this would be a perfect kicking tee; just like the professional punters use.

She was right.  After making her Football Field Loaf Candle, Bonnie made a small second project-  Football Soaps.  Using the same Silicone Football Mold from her candle, she melted Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap.  Using Fun Brown Oxide, she colored the soap.  Then, she selected a manly scent- The Perfect Man Fragrance Oil.  Once the soap hardened, she popped it out of the mold, and the football fit perfectly right in the pizza saver.  An adorable bathroom soap concept for any football lover who occasionally orders pizza too.

Besides football, Bonnie also enjoys spending time with her family.  She is a big pet lover and has 2 Dachshunds (wiener dogs).  Their names are Oscar Myer and Roxie and they love going for walks.  Because she and her husband have an RV, they enjoy camping and the outdoors whenever they can.

Bonnie also enjoys attending Zumba Fitness, and used to be an instructor of Zumba as well.

In her daily spare time, Bonnie listens to and enjoys all music types from Metallica to Miranda Lambert to Glee.  She is also very into the Candy Crush Saga Game.

When it comes to Bonnie’s Moto for life, she lives by words her mother always said:  “Listen to people’s advice, but do what you feel is right.”

To view the complete instructions for Bonnie’s Spotlight Creation Football Field Candle Loaf, you can simply click on the link.  The recipe is also available in the free recipes and classes section of the Natures Garden website.

Adding Beeswax to a Soaping Recipe

Thursday, October 17th, 2013
beeswax

Adding beeswax to your cold process recipes provides a harder, long lasting bar of soap.

So, we had a brilliant idea, and we ran with it.  But, as we learned having a brilliant idea does not always equate to a brilliant end result.  Instead, our brilliant idea was a learning experience!

The Scenario

It all started out with the scent Nectarine and Honey, which by the way happens to be a fabulous scent.  In true Natures Garden form, we wanted to take this fragrance oil and kick it up a notch.  So, to the brainstorming mobile we went- hello think tank!  Back and forth the creative ideas started flowing- anything that was related to nectarine and/or honey was noted.  What resulted was a cold process soap recipe focused around the scent Nectarine and Honey that would incorporate bee products; Honey, Beeswax, and Bee Pollen Powder.  Once we knew how luxurious this soap was going to be, the clever name Royal Honey Bee Soap seemed to be the perfect match.

The Special Bee Ingredients

Honey was an easy choice.  We know that honey contains awesome skin loving benefits.  It is a detoxifier, loaded with antioxidants, and it’s very moisturizing.  After using body products with honey your skin feels extremely soft and supple.  Through our research we found that even Cleopatra herself bathed in honey and milk to supplement her natural loveliness and beautiful, soft skin.

Bee Pollen Powder was also chosen for the benefits it provides to the skin.  Bee pollen is rich in vitamins, amino acids, and minerals.  Products with bee pollen powder leave your skin feeling naturally soft and smooth.

Beeswax was selected as our warrior.  Although this ingredient is commonly used to help harden soaps, (making them last longer) we wanted it for a different reason. It also brought another element to the table- it locks in moisture for your skin.  Besides helping to keep your skin moisturized, after using products that include beeswax- a thin protective layer is left- a shield for your skin against the harsh outside elements of your environment.

We were set.  Super excited about how magnificent this recipe was going to be, we happily plugged our ingredients into Soap Calc, double checked our values, and moved on to the testing stage.

The Creation

Everything was set.  The lye solution was cooling.  The beeswax, butters, and oils were melted.  We were just waiting on the green light (temperatures).  The excitement was thick in the air.

Finally, the time had arrived.  The soaping procedure was normal.  Really, the only changes were: honey was added at light trace, and the bee pollen at trace.  This was easy!

The soap batter was beautiful- thick, creamy and smelled divine.  There was no denying it; you could just envision how great these bars were going to turn out after cure.  Seeing this gorgeous masterpiece coming together was intoxicating.  The anticipation of molding this batter was building, and we couldn’t wait to get started.

Since Nectarine and Honey fragrance oil naturally discolors to a creamy peach and the addition of bee pollen powder will add somewhat of a yellow hue, we thought this final color would be perfect.  So, really the only thing we wanted to accomplish was a heaped loaf with peaks.  Easy, right?

Yes, it was… so easy!  The batter was poured and heaped through the center of the mold.  We felt like Pablo Picasso working on a yet to be viral masterpiece.  Everything was going as planned.  Once we started peaking with a spatula, it was perfection in its finest hour.  Each peak held to the spatula and gracefully formed the most breath-taking, stunning crests.  The playful batter was alluring, begging for more peaks, and we did just that.  We peaked and played until it was perfect.  The soap batter was not only enchanting, but also captivating visually.  It was quite possible that we may have just stumbled upon a divine soap recipe- one to go down through the ages. 

After waiting the 24 hours to remove the soap from the mold, it was almost too much to handle.  We couldn’t wait to get these beauties out and cut; let alone the rest of the cure time.  But, we did- that’s soaping 101; it comes with the territory.

Finally- the Cure is Over

The first day that the soap was finished, we couldn’t wait to give it a try.  The bars were angelic.  The color was flawless, the bars were nice and hard, the scent retention was amazing!  We just had to try them out.  To the sink we went, and this is where our demise met us.

We soaped, and we were heartbroken.  Although everything seemed to be perfect throughout this whole process, our soap bars were crumbly.  Too crumbly!  We were defeated, and it was the beeswax that was the culprit.  The same ingredient that memorized us with its playful nature in the soap batter was now our arch enemy in the final product.  We felt as though we were victims to the sirens of the soaping world.  Back to the drawing board.

Analysis

After reviewing our notes and recipe, we found that the percentage of beeswax we used in the original recipe was too high (10%).  Investigating further, we found that the normal usage rate for this ingredient was a mere 1-2%.  Yikes!

honey soap

This is a finished and cured bar of Royal Honey Bee Soap by Natures Garden.

We did recalculate and remake the Royal Honey Bee Soap Recipe.  However, this time we decided to leave out the beeswax.  The bars were still gorgeous, soothing, and the scent retention was phenomenal.  After using it our skin did feel soft, supple, and nourished.  The honey added an extravagant element of luscious royalty.  The soap bars were still a win even without the beeswax.

In hind sight- we will try again to create a soap recipe that includes beeswax just not at 10%.  Sometimes, the most memorable lessons in life are the ones that you have to see for yourself- even if they result in less than desirable outcomes.